Show us your spots! Quoll trapping in northern Queensland.

Recently, I went on a little data-collecting trip. The scenery was pretty cool and I was collecting parasites from some rather cute marsupials, so I thought it might be nice to share it with you.

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One of our rockier sites – a creek running through a gorge.

The field sites were on the Atherton Tableland, northern Queensland. Sites were in hilly, rocky areas, because we were trapping northern quolls (Dasyurus hallucatus), and they live in hilly, rocky habitats. Northern quolls are classified as ‘endangered’ by the federal government, which was one reason why this fieldwork was done – a colleague was collecting samples for population genetics analysis. Live mammal trapping involves getting up before sunrise to check traps nice and early (so the animals don’t get caught in the sun!), even though all our traps were covered with a thick layer of vegetation for protection. Walking around in the dawn light for the purposes of handling little marsupials is definitely one of those “I love my job” moments.

being at work at sunrise is not all bad.

Being at work at sunrise is not all bad.

It turns out that northern quolls are pretty easy to catch. Using collapsible cage traps baited with chicken frames from the butcher, we caught ourselves many quolls. The traps were treadle-operated, meaning that there was a little flap on the floor attached to the door of the trap by a metal rod. As an animal steps on the flap on its way in to eat the bait, it dislodges the rod and the door swings down, trapping the animal.

Northern quoll, Dasyurus hallucatus, in a bag.

Northern quoll, Dasyurus hallucatus, in a bag.

Once caught, the quolls get transferred to a handling bag where they had their measurements taken, and were examined for ectoparasites. Generally, they do not get checked for parasites, but because I was there, I collected any ectoparasites I found on each animal.

Me, collecting parasites from a quoll.

Me, collecting parasites from a quoll.

Paydirt! Ticks on the back of a quoll's ear.

Paydirt! Ticks on the back of a quoll’s ear.

After I’d finished picking at their ears and combing their fur (for fleas!), they got their photo taken – in a kitchen garbage bin, no less. It was the best thing to show up their spots, and they couldn’t jump out of it. Usually. We did have a couple of escape attempts. The purpose of the photography was as an identification method for upcoming remote camera trapping, as quolls have individual spot patterns. Then, they were done, and released at the site of capture. We caught several quolls again and again. Seems they didn’t mind the indignity of a night in a trap as long as they could have a chicken dinner!

Quoll showing us its good side.

Quoll showing us its good side.

Getting released - going...

Getting released – going…

Gone!

Gone!

Back at the lab, I have a collection of ticks, mites, fleas and lice from the quolls that were captured. I sorted them into separate vials and am now going through the process of identifying them. Some are easier than others! Very little is known about the parasites of northern quolls, so my work will shed a bit more light on the ecology of parasites on an increasingly rare marsupial.

It's like Christmas came early in the parasite lab!

Christmas came early in the parasite lab!

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